You can piece together a solid home-theater setup for just $500. That’s insane. What’s even more insane is that you can get one of the best acronym combinations in the TV world for the same price: A 4K HDR TV. This latest upgrade in resolution boasts four times as many pixels as an HDTV. With the right content, it translates to a noticeably sharper picture. HDR is probably more important for overall picture quality. Using powerful backlight systems, screen-dimming technologies, and specially mastered content, HDR enhances the set’s contrast to give you a more lifelike picture. A year ago, any kind of 4K HDR TV would set you back at least a grand. Right now, $500 gets you into the game, and there are several solid options under $1,500. You can also get your hands on an even more sought-after combination of acronyms—a 4K HDR OLED TV—starting at $2,500. Here’s what various piles of money will get into your living room.

$500

Hisense H8 (50 inches)

Don’t expect the sun-bright backlight system and wider color gamut of pricier HDR sets, but this full-array, local-dimming Hisense LCD set is one hell of a deal. For HDR, it only supports HDR10-encoded content instead of both HDR10 and Dolby Vision—but that’s still enough to play back most Netflix, Amazon, and Blu-ray HDR videos available today. There’s also a 55-inch model for only $600.

Highsense

Don’t expect the sun-bright backlight system and wider color gamut of pricier HDR sets, but this full-array, local-dimming Hisense LCD set is one hell of a deal. For HDR, it only supports HDR10-encoded content instead of both HDR10 and Dolby Vision—but that’s still enough to play back most Netflix, Amazon, and Blu-ray HDR videos available today. There’s also a 55-inch model for only $600.

$1,000

Vizio M Series (55 inches)

Vizio’s M Series has long represented an incredible amount of bang for the buck, and the 2016 sets in the series up the ante even further. Along with HDR playback that supports both HDR10 and Dolby Vision, these sets come with their own Chromecasting tablets. Google Cast features are built right in, and you can sling stuff from any mobile device to the big screen.

Vizio

Vizio’s M Series has long represented an incredible amount of bang for the buck, and the 2016 sets in the series up the ante even further. Along with HDR playback that supports both HDR10 and Dolby Vision, these sets come with their own Chromecasting tablets. Google Cast features are built right in, and you can sling stuff from any mobile device to the big screen.

$1,300

Vizio P Series (55 inches)

For a few hundred dollars more, you can get a 55-inch screen in Vizio’s higher-end P-series lineup. Those extra C-notes go toward a brighter backlight system and more granular local dimming than the M series. The P series also has better motion-handling, more HDMI inputs than its cheaper stablemate, and a nicer tablet for your Chromecasting needs.

Vizio

For a few hundred dollars more, you can get a 55-inch screen in Vizio’s higher-end P-series lineup. Those extra C-notes go toward a brighter backlight system and more granular local dimming than the M series. The P series also has better motion-handling, more HDMI inputs than its cheaper stablemate, and a nicer tablet for your Chromecasting needs.

$1,500

Samsung UN65KU7000 (65 inches)

A couple more Benjamins gets you a bigger screen and gorgeous industrial design, in the form of Samsung’s 65-inch KU7000 TV. The clever design touches extend beyond its classy frame: You can use this set as a control center for all your smart-home devices, and its slick remote can be used to control any components plugged into the TV. It only does HDR10, though.

Samsung

A couple more Benjamins gets you a bigger screen and gorgeous industrial design, in the form of Samsung’s 65-inch KU7000 TV. The clever design touches extend beyond its classy frame: You can use this set as a control center for all your smart-home devices, and its slick remote can be used to control any components plugged into the TV. It only does HDR10, though.

$1,700

Sony X930D (55 inches)

Another design standout, Sony’s 55-inch X930 set has a super-slim bezel and a 1.4-inch-deep frame. That slim profile comes at a price: Unlike most other HDR-compatible sets, it uses an edge-lit LED backlight system instead of a full-array system. It only does HDR10 content, but it does have Android TV built into it—as well as Google Cast features similar to Vizio’s sets.

Sony

Another design standout, Sony’s 55-inch X930 set has a super-slim bezel and a 1.4-inch-deep frame. That slim profile comes at a price: Unlike most other HDR-compatible sets, it uses an edge-lit LED backlight system instead of a full-array system. It only does HDR10 content, but it does have Android TV built into it—as well as Google Cast features similar to Vizio’s sets.

$2,000

Vizio P Series (65 inches)

Two grand gets you Vizio’s 65-inch P series model, and the benefits are clear. It does both HDR10 and Dolby Vision, it has 128 zones of local dimming to complement its 600-nit full-array backlight system, and it comes with that nifty tablet that doubles as a remote control.

Vizio

Two grand gets you Vizio’s 65-inch P series model, and the benefits are clear. It does both HDR10 and Dolby Vision, it has 128 zones of local dimming to complement its 600-nit full-array backlight system, and it comes with that nifty tablet that doubles as a remote control.

$2,500

LG B6 OLED 4K HDR TV (55 inches)

Here’s where things go next-level. Practically everyone who has laid eyes on an OLED TV has fallen in love with it. A 4K HDR OLED? That represents the ultimate combination of resolution, contrast, and oil-slick blacks. This is LG’s most “affordable” model that combines everything on that list. $2,500 may sound expensive, but consider the fact that a plain old 1080p OLED TV cost $15,000 a few years ago.

LG

Here’s where things go next-level. Practically everyone who has laid eyes on an OLED TV has fallen in love with it. A 4K HDR OLED? That represents the ultimate combination of resolution, contrast, and oil-slick blacks. This is LG’s most “affordable” model that combines everything on that list. $2,500 may sound expensive, but consider the fact that a plain old 1080p OLED TV cost $15,000 a few years ago.

$2,800

Samsung KS9500 (65 inches)

But there are a few benefits to dropping a bit more coin on an LCD set instead of an OLED—especially if HDR is your big draw. Not only do you get a bigger screen for less, but an LCD set can also get much brighter than an OLED. This curved 65-incher is among Samsung’s highest-end TVs, and it’s loaded with color-enhancing quantum dots. You also get the smart-home controls and universal-remote features of the lower-end models—albeit Dolby Vision support is still absent.

Samsung

But there are a few benefits to dropping a bit more coin on an LCD set instead of an OLED—especially if HDR is your big draw. Not only do you get a bigger screen for less, but an LCD set can also get much brighter than an OLED. This curved 65-incher is among Samsung’s highest-end TVs, and it’s loaded with color-enhancing quantum dots. You also get the smart-home controls and universal-remote features of the lower-end models—albeit Dolby Vision support is still absent.

$3,800

Vizio P Series (75 inches)

Here comes Vizio again. This P-series model shares the local-dimming granularity, powerful backlight system, dual HDR-encoding support, and Chromecast features of its smaller-screened stablemates. If you absolutely, positively need a 75-inch screen that has all the HDR fixins, this is just about the cheapest model out there at the moment.

Vizio

Here comes Vizio again. This P-series model shares the local-dimming granularity, powerful backlight system, dual HDR-encoding support, and Chromecast features of its smaller-screened stablemates. If you absolutely, positively need a 75-inch screen that has all the HDR fixins, this is just about the cheapest model out there at the moment.

$6,000

Sony Z9D (65 inches)

For about the same price as a ceramic Panerai, you can put what may be the brightest TV ever made in front of your La-Z-Boy. The Z9D is perhaps the ultimate HDR-capable set for a couple of innovative reasons: Its 1,000-plus-nit backlight system is purportedly brighter than any TV that’s ever existed, and its “Backlight Master Drive” system is the most fine-grained approach to local dimming available today. Simply put, this TV does HDR to perfection—just as long as it’s HDR10 content.

Sony

For about the same price as a ceramic Panerai, you can put what may be the brightest TV ever made in front of your La-Z-Boy. The Z9D is perhaps the ultimate HDR-capable set for a couple of innovative reasons: Its 1,000-plus-nit backlight system is purportedly brighter than any TV that’s ever existed, and its “Backlight Master Drive” system is the most fine-grained approach to local dimming available today. Simply put, this TV does HDR to perfection—just as long as it’s HDR10 content.

$6,000

Vizio Reference Series (65 inches)

But have no fear! If you’re looking for an equally expensive set that will support both HDR10 and Dolby Vision video, Vizio’s 65-inch Reference Series set has you needs met. Until the Sony Z9D came out, it was the undisputed leader in brightness at around 800 nits. Add a 384-zone local-dimming system and quantum-dot color enhancement, and you’re definitely getting your 6-grand worth of teevee.

Vizio

But have no fear! If you’re looking for an equally expensive set that will support both HDR10 and Dolby Vision video, Vizio’s 65-inch Reference Series set has you needs met. Until the Sony Z9D came out, it was the undisputed leader in brightness at around 800 nits. Add a 384-zone local-dimming system and quantum-dot color enhancement, and you’re definitely getting your 6-grand worth of teevee.

$8,000

LG Signature OLED G6 (65 inches)

Oh good heavens, this TV is insane. It’s the “cheap” model in LG’s beyond-flagship Signature OLED series, and its carpaccio-thin 65-inch display is mounted on a sheet of friggin’ glass. OLED + 4K + HDR (in both formats) gets you practically perfect picture quality, and there’s a great-sounding adjustable soundbar that doubles as its base. When you’re not watching movies on it, you’ll be making out with it.

LG

Oh good heavens, this TV is insane. It’s the “cheap” model in LG’s beyond-flagship Signature OLED series, and its carpaccio-thin 65-inch display is mounted on a sheet of friggin’ glass. OLED + 4K + HDR (in both formats) gets you practically perfect picture quality, and there’s a great-sounding adjustable soundbar that doubles as its base. When you’re not watching movies on it, you’ll be making out with it.

$15,000

Sony VPL-VW675ES 4K HDR projector

If you think of this high-end projector as a 300-inch 4K HDR TV, the $15K asking price is pretty reasonable. Plus, nothing shuts up your neighbor bragging about his new TV quite like blasting an 1,800-lumen lightbeam of 4K HDR glory onto the side of his house. Or onto the front of his face.

Sony

If you think of this high-end projector as a 300-inch 4K HDR TV, the $15K asking price is pretty reasonable. Plus, nothing shuts up your neighbor bragging about his new TV quite like blasting an 1,800-lumen lightbeam of 4K HDR glory onto the side of his house. Or onto the front of his face.

$20,000

LG Signature OLED G6 (77 inches)

Hey, remember that insane LG OLED from a minute ago? This is the bigger, more-expensive model. It costs $20,000. You should install this G6 in your Gulfstream G6 aeroplane, which costs $65 million. Then you should give me that flying movie palace for free.

LG

Hey, remember that insane LG OLED from a minute ago? This is the bigger, more-expensive model. It costs $20,000. You should install this G6 in your Gulfstream G6 aeroplane, which costs $65 million. Then you should give me that flying movie palace for free.

$130,000

Vizio Reference Series (120 inches)

This 120-inch version of Vizio’s Reference Series set measures 10 feet on the diagonal. It’s so big and so bright that you will save money on your winter heating bill. You will end up looking like George Hamilton if you fall asleep in front of it. If you get bored of it, you can put it outside and sell advertising on it—which may help you recoup some of its $130,000 cost.

Vizio

This 120-inch version of Vizio’s Reference Series set measures 10 feet on the diagonal. It’s so big and so bright that you will save money on your winter heating bill. You will end up looking like George Hamilton if you fall asleep in front of it. If you get bored of it, you can put it outside and sell advertising on it—which may help you recoup some of its $130,000 cost.

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4K HDR Televisions for Every Budget, From $500 to $130K