Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that’s taken over our lives.


Draymond Green. Not hacked.


Ximo Pierto/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Technology encourages us to risk the risqué.

A suggestive image here can be sent to there in but a snap.

Things can and do go wrong, though.

Golden State Warriors power forward Draymond Green is on his way to the Olympics to represent the US. He is, however, having to go via the doghouse.

As CBS Sports reports, Green took an intimate self-portrait of what is sometimes referred to as one’s “manhood” and sent it to Snapchat’s My Story.

Should you have not availed yourself of this feature, Snapchat helpfully explains: “Adding a Snap to your Story allows Snapchatters to view your Snap an unlimited number of times for 24 hours (unless you delete it, of course!).”

I feel fairly sure that Green didn’t want Snapchatters to gawk at his nether regions across all regions of the world an unlimited number of times.

His initial reaction was, however, a touch flaccid. He turned to Twitter and offered: “Hacked….. Can’t win right now.”

The general reaction — as when most celebrities claim to have been hacked after a technological faux pas — was disbelief and a touch of jocular scorn.

And so it was that, as ESPN’s Calvin Watkins reported on Twitter, Green came clean: “Draymond Green said he pushed the wrong button regarding an inappropriate picture on Snapchat. He apologized for the incident.”

The Houston Chronicle’s sportswriter Jonathan Feigen added this about the Warriors star: “Drayton [sic] Green said his snapchat snafu was intended to be a private message. He knew his mistake immediately, but not fast enough.”

There, but for the grace of Anthony Weiner, go so many.

It’s unclear how long Green’s NSFW image was up on Snapchat. He didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Things, though, haven’t gone well for him of late. During the NBA finals, he was harshly suspended for Game 5, his team ultimately lost and then he was arrested for allegedly assaulting a Michigan State football player.

It seems clear that if you do intend to send intimate images via your phone, it’s best to focus very carefully. Check and double-check. Make sure the picture is cropped just so and the addressee is clear, singular and might welcome such a snap.

As Green told Yahoo’s Michael Lee: “We’re all one click away from placing something in the wrong place. I suffered from that this morning.”

When it comes to technology, there are fewer easy lay-ups than you think.

See the original article here:  

Draymond Green admits to posting NSFW self-portrait on Snapchat – CNET