Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that’s taken over our lives.

They come to your house and encourage you to “like.” Or else.

College Humor; YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Who’s behind your everyday Facebook feeds?

What sort of people are the algorithm tweakers, the ones who have the power to show you something or, indeed, not show you something?

The sort of people who are the mafia, that’s who.

No, not the Mafia that we see in movies. Well, not quite.

This is the Facebook algorithm mafia, which comes to your house and tells you what you’re going to like.

In a witty new College Humor video, Mark Zuckerberg’s algoholic crew comes to a woman’s house and offers a little gentle persuasion.

You might not be friends with your high-school bully, but the algoholics insist you are.

You might want Facebook just to show you pictures of your friend and her new puppy.

But the algorithm mafia just wants to make a deal with you. It will let you look at those pictures, as long as you agree to look at 50 articles about something you care not a whit about.

There have been grumbling suspicions about the inner intentions of those who feed you information on Facebook for quite a while.

In recent times, the company has been accused of suppressing conservative views in its Trending Topics section.

As if it had seen this video in advance, this week Facebook declared that it was adjusting its News Feed to favor baby pictures over news.

Yes, the personal will suddenly take precedence over the latest personal utterings of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

At heart, though, the mafia has no mercy, even as it claims it’s just protecting you.

It wants you to be happy. It wants Facebook to feel like your home.

But, you know, just as in any home there are certain rules. There are certain bargains to be made too.

Commit yourself completely and you’ll get more than you bargained for. In a good way, you understand.

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Meet Facebook's ruthless algorithm mafia – CNET