Samsung’s media arm continues code red damage control in the wake of the latest report surrounding a faulty Galaxy Note 7. The incident, which occurred on a Southwest flight earlier this week, further complicates the matters for several reasons beyond the already troubling fact that it played out on a plane – which, thankfully, was still at the gate.

The device involved in the incident was reportedly in its owner’s pocket at the time of the event, having been powered down at the request of a flight attendant. Worst still, its owner adds that the Note 7 was one of the replacements sent out by Samsung after recalling the original troubled shipment that resulted in dozens of reports of faulty units.

When we reached out in the wake of the Southwest evacuation, Samsung responded,

Until we are able to retrieve the device, we cannot confirm that this incident involves the new Note7. We are working with the authorities and Southwest now to recover the device and confirm the cause. Once we have examined the device we will have more information to share.

A spokesperson followed up late last night with a more verbose response to the company’s on-going PR nightmare. Here’s that statement in full,

Samsung understands the concern our carriers and consumers must be feeling after recent reports have raised questions about our newly released replacement Note7 devices. We continue to move quickly to investigate the reported case to determine the cause and will share findings as soon as possible. We remain in close contact with the CPSC throughout this process. If we conclude a safety issue exists, we will work with the CPSC to take immediate steps to address the situation. We want to reassure our customers that we take every report seriously and we appreciate their patience as we work diligently through this process.

The statement arrives a day after a majority of US phone carriers committed to replace the handsets of concerned customers who own one of the new Galaxy Note 7 units.

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Samsung addresses concerns over Galaxy Note 7 replacement issues