By Lance Ulanoff2014-09-12 23:06:12 UTC

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Apple is still very interested in your TV set.

Just days after Apple CEO Tim Cook unveiled the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus phablet and revealed the Apple Watch, the company’s first new product category entry in years, he’s back on TV talking about Apple’s continuing interest in yet another key consumer category: televisions.

In a conversation with TV host Charlie Rose, which will air tonight on PBS, Cook said “TV is [a category] we continue to have great interest in.”

He then explained how our current television watching experience is still stuck in the 1970s.

“Think about how much your life has changed and how all the things around you have changed,” said Cook, adding that walking back into your living room to watch TV is like “rewinding the clock.” He also called the interface terrible and bemoaned the fact that we might miss a show if we don’t record it.

However, when Rose asked Cook if Apple would fix this, Cook sidestepped and pointed to the no-longer-a-hobby Apple TV, reminding Rose that they’ve added content and “it’s an area we continue to look at.”

While Cook and his predecessor, Steve Jobs, have made similar comments about TV before, the timing of this interview and these comments could be significant. Most Apple watchers believe there is one more product event in the offing before the end of this year. It will most likely address the iPad, but may also include an Apple TV update or, perhaps, an all-new Apple Television set.

It’s also just as likely that this chat is simply another leg in the post-launch Tim Cook media tour.

During the interview, Cook talked about the Beats acquisition and also noted that he thinks about Apple’s founder and former CEO, the late Steve Jobs, every day.

“He’s in my heart…[and] deep in Apple’s DNA,” Cook said.

The full interview airs Friday night at 11 p.m. ET on PBS, but some air times may differ depending on your location, according to the show’s website.

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Image: PBS