Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that’s taken over our lives.

Politically injudicious?

screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

When those who have nothing better to do than go to Twitter and spew invective at the first person they see, we’re used to it.

It’s slightly different when public figures tweet things that might be seen as just the other side of provocative.

Especially if those public figures were or are politicians in office.

Recently, former Illinois congressman Joe Walsh emitted a tweeted threat to President Barack Obama and Black Lives Matter, suggesting that “Real America” is coming after them.

On Friday night, it was the turn of West Virginia Republican lawmaker Michael Folk. He was upset that presumptive Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton wasn’t going to be tried for being more than careless with her use of a private email server.

As WOWK-TV reports, Folk offered this thought: “Hillary Clinton, you should be tried for treason, murder, and crimes against the US Constitution… then hung on the Mall in Washington, DC.” The tweet has since been removed.

These are intemperate times, but to call for the execution of the presumptive Democratic nominee seemed a little much to some.

Folk’s tweets have now been locked in the “protected mode.” However, Folk’s employer isn’t pleased at Folk’s suggestion of a public hanging.

He’s a United Airlines pilot and company spokeswoman Mary Clark told me: ‘We are appalled by comments advocating harm to any person. They do not represent United Airlines and we are looking into the matter further.”

Neither Folk nor the Clinton campaign immediately responded to requests for comment.

However, Folk initially defended his hanging thoughts by telling the Charleston Gazette-Mail: “What I called for is for her to be tried and the maximum penalty for treason is death. Technically it’s not death by hanging…”

Some might suggest that technically he was still suggesting that Clinton should be executed.

Still Folk believes he did nothing wrong and Clinton did.

He added to the Gazette-Mail: “People do wrong they need to be held accountable. And exercising a First Amendment right is not necessarily doing wrong.” No, not necessarily.

Perhaps the tone of this presidential campaign has already been set.

It will be characterized by extremities of anger, name-calling, brutal assertions, outlandish threats and a complete redefinition of what used to be called statesmanship.

Twitter will, of course, come in handy for that.

Continue reading: 

West Virginia lawmaker tweets that Hillary Clinton should be 'hung' – CNET