Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is fundraising in Silicon Valley this week, an area that’s been very good to her. According to new documents filed with the US Federal Election Commission, Californians contributed $4.3 million to Clinton’s campaign in the month of July, making it her most successful fundraising state. The Golden state ranks third among Republican nominee Donald Trump’s fundraising locations, though he took in only about $680,000 from Californians.

Overall, Clinton’s donations continue to outpace Trump’s. According to FEC data, the Democratic nominee’s campaign took in $31.2 million from about 14,000 zip codes in the month of July, while Trump collected $19.6 million from about 7,600 zip codes. In other words, the Democratic nominee collected 60 percent more money, and this in a month that many considered to be a fundraising success for Trump, who has long trailed the Democrats in outside contributions.

Since both candidates hail from New York, you’d expect both to have strong support in the Empire state—even though, overall, New York is heavily Democratic; polls favor a Clinton victory there in November. But looking at Manhattan in particular reveals considerable support for Trump, mostly concentrated on the east side of Manhattan, where his campaign is headquartered and where the Trump Tower is located. In the month of July, the zip code that’s home to Trump Tower contributed more than $15,000 to the campaign. Across town in the Columbus Circle zip code, where Trump also has a tower, Clinton collected more than $42,000.

The 10 zip codes donating the most money to the Clinton campaign are in just three metropolitan areas: New York City, centered on the upper west side and Brooklyn Heights; Washington DC and environs; and two traditionally liberal neighborhoods of San Francisco, the Mission and the Castro.

WIRED mapped the zip codes of the top 500 donors to both campaigns, for your persual. Check out the results below. (You can zoom in and out in specific areas. Dot size corresponds to the dollar amount donated in that zip code; blue represents contributions to Clinton, and red signals donations to Trump.)

Screen-Shot-2016-08-25-at-1.08.50-PM.jpgTableau/WIRED; Data: Federal Election Commission

The east side of New York is home to more Trump supporters, while the upper west side hosts more Clinton donors. Just four zip codes on the west side of Manhattan accounted for nearly $400,000 in donations to Clinton in July.

The list of states donating the most cash to the two leading candidates reads, mostly, like a list of the nation’s most populous states. Both Clinton and Trump count California, New York, Texas, and Florida among their top sources. But Trump also drew donors from Georgia, Arizona, and Pennsylvania, while Clinton counted Virginia, Washington, and Maryland among her leading fundraising states. South Dakotans sent Clinton less than $10,000 in July, making it her least successful fundraising state, while Vermont, home to erstwhile Democratic Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, was responsible for just $6,400 in Trump donations, his lowest nationally. This isn’t surprising, as a Gallup poll last year rated Vermont one of the nation’s most Democratic states.

Screen-Shot-2016-08-25-at-1.12.50-PM.jpgTableau/WIRED; Data: Federal Election Commission

One of Clinton’s fundraisers this week was co-hosted by Apple CEO Tim Cook. In the 2008 presidential campaign Cook donated $2,300 to Barack Obama; this July donors in his zip code contributed more than $50,000 to Clinton’s campaign. Indeed, the San Francisco Bay Area looks mostly like a sea of blue, with a few exceptions: Trump took in about $5,000 from donors in the tony area of Tiburon, in Marin County just north of San Francisco, and about $3,300 from donors in Menlo Park, the Silicon Valley city that’s home to Facebook.

In southern California, the liberal west side of Los Angeles is blue-toned, while more conservative Orange County is predictably home to Trump donors. And in the Washington DC area, Trump’s donations came from south of the Potomac, while Clinton donors came from Washington DC proper and its Democratic-leaning Maryland suburbs.

Screen-Shot-2016-08-25-at-1.15.18-PM.jpgTableau/WIRED; Data: Federal Election Commission

Two Texas cities close to the Mexican border—El Paso and Alamo—are in Trump’s top 500, which is interesting in light of Trump’s harsh stance on immigration. Now, since candidates submit monthly reports to the Federal Election Commission, we’ll create a new map each month until November 8. Check back in September.


Where Are Trump’s and Clinton’s Biggest Donations Coming From? We Made a Map