Whether it’s been Hillary Clinton collapsing because of pneumonia, the shake-up at The Great British Bake-Off, or Donald Trump finally admitting what everyone has known all along, the Internet hasn’t been short on things to have opinions about this week. But say you’ve been stuck under a Wi-Fi-unfriendly rock for the past seven days: what stories would you have missed that you really need to know about? Well, these ones.

Welcome to the World, Harambe McHarambeface. Sort of.

What Happened: For a brief, shining moment, the spirit of Harambe lived on online, but it was just a ghost.
Where It Blew Up: Twitter, media reports
What Really Happened: Consider this one a perfect collision of the memes. Perhaps you remember Harambe, the poor gorilla who was killed earlier this year by the Cincinnati Zoo after a 4-year-old climbed into the gorilla enclosure. And maybe you remember Boaty McBoatface, the winner of the UK online poll to name a science vessel, which happened in the same month. You remember both? OK, then you’re fully prepared to learn that a Chinese zoo held an online poll to name a new baby gorilla, and the winning name was Harambe McHarambeface. The news, amplified by Reddit, was quickly shared across the Internet, and—as you should expect—delighted Twitter:

There’s only one problem: It’s not actually true.

The hoax, which relied upon people’s combined worst expectations of the Internet and humanity, ended up being debunked multiple times, as if no one could really understand how they’d actually fallen for it. The answer, of course, was simple: for a brief, wonderful second everyone thought the Internet’s tendency for self-referentiality had formed into a perfect whole that would haunt a poor ape for his entire life. It’s what we’ve all been hoping for, all along.
The Takeaway: If we’ve learned anything from this whole mess, it’s that even though this particular Harambe McHarambeface turned out to be a lie, that doesn’t mean that—if we all worked together, towards a common goal—we couldn’t make it happen for real in the future.

This Doesn’t Look Good

What Happened:
Where It Blew Up: Twitter, media reports
What Really Happened: It’s possible that you’d heard of Amariyanna “Mari” Copeny before this week; she was the 8-year-old who gained some small fame earlier this year after writing a letter to President Obama, inviting him to Flint, Michigan to meet her. That ploy was successful, but it turned out, there was a karmic balance to be had, which would explain what happened to the now-9-year-old this week:

Yes, Mari met Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. And look at her reaction.

It was the photo that the Internet couldn’t resist, expressing people’s concern about Donald Trump in a way that words can’t manage. It would be the definitive Donald Trump image of the week, if it weren’t for this:

The Takeaway: Not all photo ops are good photo ops.

On Your Marks! Get Set! Replace!

What Happened: The Great British Bake-Off is moving networks and losing its hosts in the process, which means it’s time for the Internet to step in with suggestions about where the show should go from here.
Where It Blew Up: Twitter, media reports
What Really Happened: You can tell that a TV show has become a phenomenon when news about it switching networks is picked up internationally. (Also, when royalty feel the need to comment on it. Such it was when The Great British Bake-Off was announced as leaving the BBC for Channel 4, leading to an announcement that hosts Mel and Sue will leave the show at the end of this season. (Whether or not judges Paul and Mary are staying on has yet to be revealed.)

Immediately, the Internet en masse had the same thought: Who could replace Mel and Sue as the hosts? Thankfully, it turned out that there were a lot of options, as Twitter shared:

The Takeaway: With the current season only on its fourth episode (good job, Benjamina), it’s maybe a little too early to be talking about the Mel and Sue era in the past tense, as some have pointed out…

…but nonetheless, they really will be missed. Hey, BBC: We can bake. Just sayin’.

Prepare Yourselves: A New Lady Gaga Album Is Coming

What Happened: Hey, remember Lady Gaga? Twitter does.
Where It Blew Up:Twitter
What Really Happened: After a relatively low-key couple of years, it’s beginning to look like Lady Gaga is making a bid to own the end of 2016. She’s back onscreen in the new season of American Horror Story (although perhaps not as recognizably as some would hope), and, as she teased this week—

—she’s got a new album on the way, too. It’s her first in three years. But do you think her fanbase is ready for all this new Gagaism?

OK, that would seem to be a yes. Indeed, the Gaga portion of the Internet went on high alert with the news of the new album, from discussing the title (Joanne), to considering Gaga’s choice of headwear on the album cover, to simply analyzing the cover art for clues about what to expect.

As much as we love to snark about the Internet, there’s something genuinely wonderful about seeing fans get to geek out about their beloved favorites. You go, Lady Gaga fans! Embrace the excitement and anticipation of what’s to come! Live the dream, you beautiful little monsters!

The Takeaway: This enthusiasm is great and all, but let’s keep our expectations realistic. It’s way too early to start contemplating a follow-up.

The Triumphant Return of #CheeseBooks

What Happened: A long-forgotten hashtag made a surprise return on Twitter, but given the puns on offer, it was good to see it back.
Where It Blew Up: Twitter
What Really Happened: Here’s the thing. #cheesebooks, as a hashtag, isn’t even vaguely new. It’s been around since 2012. (A favorite from the olden days: “Paddington Camenbert.”) So what brought it back this week to such an extent that it was the primary trending topic on Twitter? It’s hard to tell, but also, who cares when the rewards are puns like this?

The Takeaway: This is the winner, either for inventiveness or sheer dedication to the joke. Six puns in one!


While You Were Offline: And God Said, ‘Let There Be Harambe McHarambeface’